in Running, It's Hot in Texas and Our Weather is Crazy

The only thing not wet in Dallas is … just kidding. Everything’s wet.

Wet in DallasYou might have heard about the freak amount of rain we’re getting in Dallas, along with the rest of Texas and Oklahoma. Lives have been lost, roads flooded. So I feel a little guilty for being concerned with how wet the air is, now that I’m running regularly again and trying to re-acclimatize.

I ran my first marathon in December. Had knee issues afterward. Took some time off. I’ve just now taken up an intermediate 5K plan. And all I can focus on is, wow, it’s really, really hard to breathe in this soup.

Average humidity in Dallas is over 70-ish%. I’m pretty sure it was more than that yesterday evening. While running at Lake Cliff Park, I was so thrilled to spot a disgusting water fountain with a mysterious scent.  I didn’t care. If the little bowl part had been big enough, I would have crawled right up in it and bathed.

I walked, then tried to run again. I bargained with myself. Just run from here to that street sign, then you can walk again. I flummoxed over to another sketchy fountain and rubbed palmfuls of water over my already-wet ears, face and neck.

The air was so heavy. My breathing was so heavy. It felt like I’d never done this before. The word “waterboarding” came to my mind … then I felt guilty, again (I know I know — as I should have).

Hyperbolic whining was setting in. I was losing perspective. It was beginning to feel like my body felt like overpacked luggage I was having to haul from one end of the airport to the other.

The softball field was flooded. Kids were kicking up wet, red dirt-water and having the time of their lives.

The wet air — and wet everything else — in Dallas is real.